Rock's Backpages Writers' Blogs » Elaine Cusack http://www.rocksbackpagesblogs.com Rock reviews, rock articles & rock interviews from the Ultimate Rock'n'Roll Library Sun, 19 May 2013 03:11:17 +0000 en-US hourly 1 Bridie Jackson and the Arbour http://www.rocksbackpagesblogs.com/2013/04/bridie-jackson-and-the-arbour/ http://www.rocksbackpagesblogs.com/2013/04/bridie-jackson-and-the-arbour/#comments Mon, 22 Apr 2013 21:26:29 +0000 Elaine Cusack http://www.rocksbackpagesblogs.com/?p=52662 Continue reading ]]>

Newcastle’s brightest stars, Bridie Jackson and the Arbour recently won Glastonbury’s Emerging Talent competition. They pipped thousands of other artists to the post and their reward is to play Glastonbury’s main stage this summer. Hurrah for the lasses from Heaton, the boho Newcastle neighbourhood that spawned Chas Chandler, bassist of The Animals and musical big bruv of Hendrix and Slade.

I saw Bridie Jackson and the Arbour perform their “Frog Rock” (that’s a mixture of Folk and Prog!) a couple of weeks ago in Newcastle. They supported international dub legend Jean ‘Binta’ Breeze who was back from Jamaica for the gig. Jean was amazing. She had the audience in the palm of her hand. She loved Bridie Jackson. So did Newcastle legend, Peter Mortimer who saw the band play a fair few months ago and signed them up for his forthcoming seaside words and music festival taking place in Cullercoats next month.

Peter Mortimer is a writer (poet, playwright, journalist) and publisher. He’s a legend up here in North East England. In 1973 he set up the fiercely independent Iron Press and this year he’s celebrating it’s 40th birthday with a five day literary festival with a difference.

The Iron Age festival runs from May 15th to the 19th in Cullercoats, a fishing village 20 minutes from Newcastle city centre. The festival includes performances by Ian McMillan, David Almond, Bridie Jackson and the Arbour, Sean O’Brien and Melvyn Bragg. I’ve signed up for a “maritime adventure” on the Saturday. This involves going out on a fishing boat and hopefully being inspired to write haiku. My words will then be honed in a haiku workshop the following day and I will be rewarded with a fish and chip lunch overlooking Cullercoats harbour.

Throughout the festival a Snooker tournament will take place but only those published by Iron can take part!

It’s gonna be great. I’ve got myself a festival pass and am looking forward to it.*

For more information visit http://www.ironpress.co.uk/ironage.html

* I’m also reading some of my poems at the festival’s club on the Saturday evening!

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You Know How Boys Do Brag: Tracey Thorn http://www.rocksbackpagesblogs.com/2013/01/boys-do-brag/ http://www.rocksbackpagesblogs.com/2013/01/boys-do-brag/#comments Sun, 20 Jan 2013 14:04:39 +0000 Elaine Cusack http://www.rocksbackpagesblogs.com/?p=51771

How wonderful to see Tracey Thorn praised and celebrated once again. Quite right too. I can’t help smiling when commentators er, comment favourably on her tweets or seem surprised she has produced a well-written autobiography. Of course she’s produced a great book. She can write! She’s dead clever and she’s one the biggest influences on my little life!

I first discovered Tracey 30 years ago on Cherry Red’s compliation Pillows and Prayers. This 99p LP featured her not once but three times as a solo artist, as guitarist and chief songwriter with the Marine Girls and as one half of the duo Everything but the Girl.

Her voice, her lyrics, her politics and her effortless cool poured off the vinyl into my ears. It warmed my teenage soul and fuelled my imagination. I wanted to be like her so I picked up a guitar and tried writing songs. I didn’t get very far with the guitar but I stuck with the writing and over the years I have derived a huge amount of inspiration from Tracey’s lyrics and singing.

I wrote a fan letter to her in the mid 1980s and we had a short-lived correspondence. In one of my letters I asked if she had ever gone out with a certain chap. I got my wires crossed over this guy and ended up telling her a different name. She sent back a postcard with her answer. It was a black and white image of Garbo with pin marks in the corners. Had it been pinned on my heroine’s wall? In her distinctive handwriting she wrote: “I don’t recall going with [him] but you know how boys do brag…” You know how boys do brag. What a phrase! Why, I could almost here her singing it on her solo album, A Distant Shore.

I followed my heroine to Hull University where I studied the same subject, English. I remember asking one of the lecturers what Tracey was like. Without hesitating he said: “She was the brightest student I have ever encountered.”

Intelligent, talented, successful…what a woman. What a heroine.

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Adolescent self discovered in coastal auction house http://www.rocksbackpagesblogs.com/2012/11/adolescent-self-discovered-in-coastal-auction-house/ http://www.rocksbackpagesblogs.com/2012/11/adolescent-self-discovered-in-coastal-auction-house/#comments Sat, 03 Nov 2012 13:22:01 +0000 Elaine Cusack http://www.rocksbackpagesblogs.com/?p=51101 Continue reading ]]> I live in a very cool part of the North East. The magnificent North Sea is a seven minute scamper from my doorstep. Every seaside stroll offers a different, free experience.

As if that wasn’t enough, I’ve got a high street filled with independent shops round the corner from Cusack Mansions. There’s a butcher, a baker, a deli, two florists, an art gallery, a couple of antiques shops, several amazing charity shops and an auction house which holds weekly auctions.

I love the auction house. It’s like eBay but without the postage and the tiresome feedback system. I’ve incorporated viewing auction lots into my Wednesday afternoons ahead of the Thursday auctions. The auctions are a hoot. Folk are eating, talking on their mobiles and doing all the things you don’t expect to see at auctions.

Last Wednesday I saw two lots I wanted. One was a handful of left wing books and pamphlets and the second a box of LPs with Ghost in the Machine by The Police sitting at the front of the pile. I left bids (for £2 and £5 respectively…hey Big Spendah!!) and was delighted to learn I’d “won” the records.

I’ve got back into vinyl big time this year. I’m so glad I never got rid of my record collection but I’m missing key records from the early 1980s due to the Stalinist revision of my music taste carried out in 1983/84. At the time The Smiths, Jesus and Mary Chain, Billy Bragg and the Velvets were never off my record player. I was ashamed of my adolescent taste and sold all my Nick Heyward, early Duran Duran and Police albums.

Oh how I had loved The Police. Zenyatta Mondatta was the first LP I bought by myself with my own money in a record shop. I later acquired Outlandos d’Amour and Reggatta de Blanc and of course Ghost in the Machine when it came out in 1981.

I loved everything about The Police. I loved the music, the lyrics and the obvious band chemistry seen in their goofy videos and photo shoots. I was in awe of Stewart Copeland’s drumming and height. I wanted to hang out with Andy Summers and years later I tried not to look star struck when I sold him a Henry Miller first edition in a central London antiquarian bookshop.

Then there was Sting. I was proud of this fellow Geordie’s success but I did not repeat NOT fancy him. Fed up to the back teeth of classmates asking me if I fancied him I announced one lunch time “I love The Police because they play white reggae.” It was a direct quote from a music biography (possibly published by Omnibus?) I’d bought on holiday in Scotland in 1981. Everyone else was obsessed with Charles and Diana’s wedding. I was dreaming about becoming a roadie for The Police.

This summer I bought Outlandos d’Amour as part of a job lot of vinyl sold off by the local hospital radio station. I had my eye out for a copy Ghost in the Machine and knew I had to place a bid when I saw it at the auction house. What else did I get in my lot? Donna Summer, John Lennon, George Benson and…Duran Duran’s Rio! Playing this record was like opening a cupboard in my adolescent bedroom stuffed with leg warmers, cheap make up, ra ra skirts and a pile of Smash Hits Yearbooks!

It feels great to own and listen to The Police and Duran Duran after 30 years. I feel connected to my adolescent self and I appreciate the records for what they are. I never picked up on Duran’s huge debt to Roxy Music and Bowie when I first owned Rio but I do now. I also love the record’s artwork by Malcolm Garrette.

As for Ghost in the Machine…wow! What great artwork plus Invisible Sun reminds me how this record stirred my political feelings. It made me think about Northern Ireland and nuclear weapons and laid the ground for my interest in pure socialism and CND.

I wonder what will happen when I allow myself to hold open the gatefold sleeve of Nick Heyward’s debut album, North of a Miracle? I’ll let you know when I find a copy!

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Davy Jones – a True Friend http://www.rocksbackpagesblogs.com/2012/09/davy-jones-a-true-friend/ http://www.rocksbackpagesblogs.com/2012/09/davy-jones-a-true-friend/#comments Sat, 01 Sep 2012 16:50:12 +0000 Elaine Cusack http://www.rocksbackpagesblogs.com/2012/09/davy-jones-a-true-friend/

Whenever I sit down to put down my thoughts about “back in the day,” I seem to be going through “Six Degrees of Separation,” because inevitably I have encountered someone, through someone else, that I never thought I’d connect with. My trip to Houston on the Monkees tour is a prime example of that.

In 1962, Jan Berry (left) and Dean Torrance,
Jan and Dean were my faves!
(Image Source: Yesterdays Gold)

In 1962 I was working at Disneyland (2 miles from my home) and when I got my first paycheck, I bought my very first record album “Jan and Dean’s Greatest Hits.” I’m pretty sure it was $4.50. Along with James Darren (who I fell in love with as Moondoggie watching “Gidget” starring Sandra Dee), I had Jan and Dean’s pictures taped to my closet door. Loved their music, dreamy to look at and I was totally into surfing (not as a surfer girl, but spending hours on the beach with my girlfriends watching the surfers!). It was a 30 minute drive from my house to Newport Beach and Huntington Beach.

Once the Beatles came on the scene, my Jan and Dean album stayed in the back of my closet and it’s not one I moved with me when I moved away from home and got an apartment in Hollywood. Like everyone else, on April 12, 1966 I was horrified to hear of Jan Berry’s car crash which almost killed him. He survived but the accident left him with severe brain damage, unable to walk, speak, and paralyzed on his right side. Publicists presented his condition as “he’ll be fine.” But he wasn’t. And as quickly as the accident had happened, Jan was rarely mentioned in the news again. Flash forward to August 1967.

My two days in Dallas were a blast (see my post from August 23rd “The Monkees Great Escape,”) even the scary moments. After the concert in Dallas, I flew down to Houston. I remember landing at the airport about one in the morning, and as I walked down the airplane ramp (no jetways yet!), across the tarmac and through the terminal, when the sliding doors opened it was like a blast from hell. I had never been in such a humid, hot climate. I climbed into a cab and the trip to my hotel was more than uncomfortable. The cab had no air conditioning and even at that time of the morning I was soaking wet by the time I got to the hotel!

After a welcome night’s sleep in the air conditioned hotel, I spent the day exploring Houston on my own. I was scheduled to meet up with the Monkees for dinner before their show at the Sam Houston Coliseum. Davy had heard of a British restaurant one block from our hotel, so he gathered everyone up for an authentic English meal. Mike was the only Monkee who didn’t join us, because he took a group of his relatives to dinner elsewhere.

At the “Red Lion” restaurant, Davy encouraged everyone to order steak, kidney and mushroom pie with Yorkshire pudding. I’m pretty sure I stuck with a slab of prime rib with my Yorkshire pudding. As we waited for our meals, Peter and Davy carried on for fifteen minutes acting out the various British accents. Really fun!

A special guest of Davy’s that night was, have you guessed? Jan Berry. Davy had become a friend of Jan’s and felt it would be good for his rehabilitation to experience a Monkees concert and “hanging out” with the band. Davy and Jan sat directly across from me. I was dumbstruck when I first saw Jan walk unsteadily in and take his seat. The brain damage had made him like an amnesiac, he had to learn everything as if he were a newborn baby. At this point in his rehabilitation, he spoke, like a five year old, he drew with crayons on pieces of paper and proudly showed them off for everyone to see and praise him. At one point he was talking just to me and he said, “I know my A, B, C’s.” And he proceeded to slowly tell me the letters of the alphabet. Everyone treated Jan with great respect and I felt so fortunate to observe Davy’s kindness and friendship to a fallen angel.

Good times. . .Ann Moses reporting about “back in the day.”

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Whenever I sit down to put down my thoughts about “back in the day,” I seem to be going through “Six Degrees of Separation,” because inevitably I have encountered someone, through someone else, that I never thought I’d connect with. My trip to Houston on the Monkees tour is a prime example of that.

In 1962, Jan Berry (left) and Dean Torrance,
Jan and Dean were my faves!
(Image Source: Yesterdays Gold)

In 1962 I was working at Disneyland (2 miles from my home) and when I got my first paycheck, I bought my very first record album “Jan and Dean’s Greatest Hits.” I’m pretty sure it was $4.50. Along with James Darren (who I fell in love with as Moondoggie watching “Gidget” starring Sandra Dee), I had Jan and Dean’s pictures taped to my closet door. Loved their music, dreamy to look at and I was totally into surfing (not as a surfer girl, but spending hours on the beach with my girlfriends watching the surfers!). It was a 30 minute drive from my house to Newport Beach and Huntington Beach.

Once the Beatles came on the scene, my Jan and Dean album stayed in the back of my closet and it’s not one I moved with me when I moved away from home and got an apartment in Hollywood. Like everyone else, on April 12, 1966 I was horrified to hear of Jan Berry’s car crash which almost killed him. He survived but the accident left him with severe brain damage, unable to walk, speak, and paralyzed on his right side. Publicists presented his condition as “he’ll be fine.” But he wasn’t. And as quickly as the accident had happened, Jan was rarely mentioned in the news again. Flash forward to August 1967.

My two days in Dallas were a blast (see my post from August 23rd “The Monkees Great Escape,”) even the scary moments. After the concert in Dallas, I flew down to Houston. I remember landing at the airport about one in the morning, and as I walked down the airplane ramp (no jetways yet!), across the tarmac and through the terminal, when the sliding doors opened it was like a blast from hell. I had never been in such a humid, hot climate. I climbed into a cab and the trip to my hotel was more than uncomfortable. The cab had no air conditioning and even at that time of the morning I was soaking wet by the time I got to the hotel!

After a welcome night’s sleep in the air conditioned hotel, I spent the day exploring Houston on my own. I was scheduled to meet up with the Monkees for dinner before their show at the Sam Houston Coliseum. Davy had heard of a British restaurant one block from our hotel, so he gathered everyone up for an authentic English meal. Mike was the only Monkee who didn’t join us, because he took a group of his relatives to dinner elsewhere.

At the “Red Lion” restaurant, Davy encouraged everyone to order steak, kidney and mushroom pie with Yorkshire pudding. I’m pretty sure I stuck with a slab of prime rib with my Yorkshire pudding. As we waited for our meals, Peter and Davy carried on for fifteen minutes acting out the various British accents. Really fun!

A special guest of Davy’s that night was, have you guessed? Jan Berry. Davy had become a friend of Jan’s and felt it would be good for his rehabilitation to experience a Monkees concert and “hanging out” with the band. Davy and Jan sat directly across from me. I was dumbstruck when I first saw Jan walk unsteadily in and take his seat. The brain damage had made him like an amnesiac, he had to learn everything as if he were a newborn baby. At this point in his rehabilitation, he spoke, like a five year old, he drew with crayons on pieces of paper and proudly showed them off for everyone to see and praise him. At one point he was talking just to me and he said, “I know my A, B, C’s.” And he proceeded to slowly tell me the letters of the alphabet. Everyone treated Jan with great respect and I felt so fortunate to observe Davy’s kindness and friendship to a fallen angel.

Good times. . .Ann Moses reporting about “back in the day.”

Read more: 

Davy Jones – a True Friend

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Shut Up Little Man! http://www.rocksbackpagesblogs.com/2011/11/shut-up-little-man/ http://www.rocksbackpagesblogs.com/2011/11/shut-up-little-man/#comments Sun, 20 Nov 2011 10:15:39 +0000 Elaine Cusack http://www.rocksbackpagesblogs.com/?p=47580 Newcastle’s Press Play Festival is happening right now on Tyneside. The smart gang behind Press Play create unique cinematic experiences in and around Newcastle upon Tyne. Their current four day DIY Weekender, started on Thursday and ends today. Check out their website for more info www.pressplayfestival.org

Not many people realise that Newcastle has three independent cinemas and they are all being used by Press Play this weekend. Yesterday I went to the 48 seater Side Cinema on the city’s quayside to see Shut Up Little Man! the feature film debut by Australian documentary maker Matthew Bate.

The film describes an amazing tale which begins back in 1987 when Wisconsin students Eddie and Mitch head to San Francisco for adventure. They move into a shabby apartment and are alarmed by the late night antics of their aging neighbours. Gay Peter and homophobe Ray share a flat where they drink until insults fly and punches are thrown.

Eddie and Mitch make audio recordings of the nightly dramas which soon become a viral audio sensation (without the help of the internet). Eddie and Mitch are faced with moral as well as legal questions over their illicit recordings…but what will they do?

I don’t want to give anything away but will say the film includes interviews with most of the main players as well as film makers and comic artists. There are also fans of Pete and Ray, who mimic their heroes in the same way Python fans recount their favourite Life of Brian lines.

This film is beautifully and sensitively made. There is humour, sadness and scope to debate the ethics long after the film ends. Are these recordings any different from the hacked phone calls by Rupert Murdoch’s journalists? You decide.

Shut Up Little Man! premiered in competition at the 2011 Sundance Film Festival. It was recently acquired by Tribeca Films. Badger your local independent cinema to screen it.

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Sir Cliff and Glenn Campbell live in Newcastle http://www.rocksbackpagesblogs.com/2011/10/sir-cliff-and-glenn-campbell-live-in-newcastle/ http://www.rocksbackpagesblogs.com/2011/10/sir-cliff-and-glenn-campbell-live-in-newcastle/#comments Sun, 30 Oct 2011 10:33:46 +0000 Elaine Cusack http://www.rocksbackpagesblogs.com/?p=47352 If someone had told the 15 year old Elaine that one weekend in the future she’d see both Cliff Richard and Glenn Campbell in concert, she’d have shouted abuse, slammed her bedroom door and turned up the volume on Jesus and Mary’s Chain’s ‘Psychocandy’ album. Give money to a Tory supporter and a Republican? The very idea!

Well, 26 years on I’m sitting here looking at my ticket stubs for Sir Cliff’s ‘Soulicious’ tour and Glenn Campbell’s farewell tour. And my head’s full of their hits from the past 50 years.

I’m not a huge fan of Cliff but my dear Mam is. It was her 75th birthday on Thursday and when I realized Cliff was set to play Newcastle the following evening I knew I had to take her. By then I’d already bought tickets to see Glenn play Newcastle’s City Hall on the Saturday evening. Two legends in as many nights…rock and roll!

Is it fair to compare and contrast the self-styled Peter Pan of Pop with a man suffering from Alzheimer’s? Sir Cliff is 71 years but from where I was sitting in Newcastle’s Metro Arena he looked about 20 years younger. His show was slick with lithe dancers, guest singers, multiple costume changes and flattering lighting. Perhaps these stage tricks are the secrets to looking young?!

Cliff informed his adoring fans that the ‘Soulicious’ album is “where I’m at right now but I can’t forget the journey I’ve been on.” Cliff treated us to gems from his back catalogue performed in a chronological order with ‘Soulicious’ tracks in between.

Cliff seemed to enjoy inviting onstage some of the singers who helped him create ‘Soulicious’ including Lamont Dozier, Freda Payne and Percy Sledge. I felt it was value for money when these singers performed their own songs. I didn’t expect to hear ‘Band of Gold’ and ‘When A Man Loves A Woman’ but I feel better for seeing these classic songs brought to life.

Cliff’s fans adore him but it was hard to feel the love in Newcastle Arena’s air hangar of a building. By contrast, Newcastle’s City Hall was stuffed with love from the audience and the stage. Glenn’s band features three of his children and I could feel their loving support for him throughout the show.

Glenn started falteringly with ‘Gentle on my Mind’ but was soon into his stride with ‘Galveston.’ He made jokes, impersonated Elvis and delighted us with unique versions of ‘Where’s The Playground Susie?’ and ‘By the Time I Get To Phoenix.’ Tracks from his latest album, ‘Ghost on the Canvas’ stood tall and proud next to his back catalogue. Lyrics of love, the past, regret and death made the performance poignant and life-affirming.

The show’s crescendo was an astonishing version of ‘Wichita Lineman’ and a singalong rendition of ‘Rhinestone Cowboy.’ Newcastle gave Glenn and co a standing ovation. This gig was one of the best gigs I’ve ever seen. What on earth would my younger self say?!

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A Walk On Part: The Fall of New Labour http://www.rocksbackpagesblogs.com/2011/10/a-walk-on-part-the-fall-of-new-labour/ http://www.rocksbackpagesblogs.com/2011/10/a-walk-on-part-the-fall-of-new-labour/#comments Mon, 17 Oct 2011 08:03:54 +0000 Elaine Cusack http://www.rocksbackpagesblogs.com/?p=47118 Continue reading ]]> Quality drama is heading to London this autumn.

A Walk On Part: The Fall of New Labour is the stage adaptation of former MP Chris Mullin’s diaries and starts a run at the Soho Theatre on 15th November.

The critically acclaimed diaries were effortlessly adapted for stage by Michael Chaplin and first performed at Newcastle’s Live Theatre in the spring. The show got rave reviews and now London theatregoers can take a ringside seat and enjoy an insider’s view of the last and most turbulent decade in British politics.

I saw the play in Newcastle and was blown away by the content and performances. The play made me think, laugh and almost cry. The five cast members are amazing. They bring to life a whopping 96 characters including Tony Blair, John Prescott, a Durham taxi-driver, the Prime minister of Ethiopia and the former MP for Sunderland South, Chris Mullin.

I urge you to book tickets for A Walk On Part The Fall of New Labour at the Soho Theatre
Tuesday 15th Nov to Saturday 10th December 2011.

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Great Little Feat cover! http://www.rocksbackpagesblogs.com/2011/09/great-little-feat-cover/ http://www.rocksbackpagesblogs.com/2011/09/great-little-feat-cover/#comments Wed, 07 Sep 2011 13:34:53 +0000 Elaine Cusack http://www.rocksbackpagesblogs.com/?p=46305 Continue reading ]]> My friend Kim Warren has just recorded a fantastic version of Roll Um Easy. It’s up on You Tube and I’d love to know what other RBP bloggers make of it
www.youtube.com/watch?v=KbNMwtPjOhc

With the nights drawing in I could just see Jools Holland introducing her on ‘Later’…

Thoughts?

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Mercury Prize Panel Gets It Right! http://www.rocksbackpagesblogs.com/2011/09/mercury-prize-panel-gets-it-right/ http://www.rocksbackpagesblogs.com/2011/09/mercury-prize-panel-gets-it-right/#comments Tue, 06 Sep 2011 21:37:47 +0000 Elaine Cusack http://www.rocksbackpagesblogs.com/?p=46303 Hurrah for sensible decisions!
Polly Harvey thoroughly deserved to win this year’s Mercury Prize. Let Dorset Shake with pride!

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“Bellboyyyyyy!” Quadrophenia by the Sea http://www.rocksbackpagesblogs.com/2011/08/%e2%80%9cbellboyyyyyy%e2%80%9d-quadrophenia-by-the-sea/ http://www.rocksbackpagesblogs.com/2011/08/%e2%80%9cbellboyyyyyy%e2%80%9d-quadrophenia-by-the-sea/#comments Sat, 20 Aug 2011 10:58:42 +0000 Elaine Cusack http://www.rocksbackpagesblogs.com/?p=46119 Continue reading ]]>

Last night the north east rather than the south east coast of England was the setting for a special screening of Quadrophenia. The 1979 mod classic opened The Whitley Bay Film Festival 2011 which runs until next Sunday.

What an inspired choice for the first night! I missed the sea front scooter run scheduled for 6.30pm but arrived at biker-friendly venue, The Trojan Rooms as it filled with Ace Faces.

The venue is used to playing host to a variety of events from gigs to meditation classes but last night it was turned into a 1970s style local cinema. I loved the details: popcorn on sale, the Pearl and Dean theme tune and a spoof local business advert shown before the film. Nice touches.

It felt like I was watching the film with a bunch of mates rather than a room of strangers. Audience members shouted out quotes, sang or tapped feet along to the soundtrack and pointed at established Brit actors like Ray Winstone and Timothy Spall. How they’ve all changed in 30 years. Local-ish lad Sting is the only one who still looks good.

As the credits rolled we clapped both the film and the festival team. This is the festival’s second year and organisers, local film production company Primate Productions, should be proud of what they’ve achieved. They secured Whitley Bay-born screenwriting legend Ian La Frenais as festival patron and worked with local council and businesses to produce an imaginative programme utilising local buildings.

Festival highlights include tonight’s Secret Cinema. Meet at 8.30pm for a classic film at a site specific location. Apparently the screening “may not be suitable for persons of a nervous disposition.” On Monday evening The Fog will be screened at local landmark, St Mary’s Lighthouse.

Next Thursday a classic horror double bill: An American Werewolf in London and the Hammer Horror Dracula will be screened at iconic building, the century old Spanish City Dome. Dress code is “Naked, covered suspiciously in blood and lying, shivering in the foetal position.” Hmm I’ll have to see if I have anything suitable in my wardrobe..

The programme also includes an Ian La Frenais day plus screenings of work by local film makers. Oh yes and plenty of child-friendly events. Something for all the family. If you’re in the region, come along!

www.whitleybayfilmfestival.co.uk www.primateproductions.co.uk

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