Rock's Backpages Writers' Blogs » Chris Charlesworth http://www.rocksbackpagesblogs.com Rock reviews, rock articles & rock interviews from the Ultimate Rock'n'Roll Library Sun, 19 May 2013 03:11:17 +0000 en-US hourly 1 The Monkees Great Escape http://www.rocksbackpagesblogs.com/2012/08/the-monkees-great-escape/ http://www.rocksbackpagesblogs.com/2012/08/the-monkees-great-escape/#comments Thu, 23 Aug 2012 13:27:21 +0000 Chris Charlesworth http://www.rocksbackpagesblogs.com/2012/08/the-monkees-great-escape/

Once Peter and I got to know one another, he was always so nice, treating me like a friend and willing to answer any of my questions.He would even ask me things about my life. When you are interviewing superstars, that’s unusual!

It had been about a couple of months since the Monkees wrapped their first season on television, and I hadn’t seen them for weeks as they prepared for their big summer tour starting at Wembly Pool stadium in London on June 30, 1967. For their last few appearances on the tour, I had made arrangements to fly into Dallas and spend four days with them beginning August 8, 1967.

I had been on several tours with Paul Revere and the Raiders, Dino, Desi and Billy and The Standells; and I had been to a few Monkee concerts. My favorite was when the Monkees appeared at the Hollywood Bowl in Hollywood and Micky finished the show in spectacular fashion by leaping into the fountain/pool in front of the stage. While this wasn’t my first tag-along, I was still not immune to the excitement and that feeling of being someone very special to be a part of their entourage.

I flew into Dallas. Nothing remarkable about that except that my first time on an airplane was when I had just turned 18, and this was just about a year later, so even the air travel was thrilling. The boys spent the day before their concert resting and lounging at our hotel. I managed some time by the pool and got some great pictures of Davy and Peter as they relaxed with their friends who were their guests on tour.

The next day was a “work” day, and Peter invited me to ride along in his limo for a guest appearance (and

Mike answering questions at radio station KVIL in Dallas.

promotion) on radio station KVIL. The disc jockeys were amazed at how competent Peter was at the control panel playing records and how comfortably he carried on as a “guest disc jockey” between numbers. The Monkees had met the Beatles when they were in London, so it wasn’t surprising that Peter chose to play cuts from “Sgt. Pepper’s” album.

Soon, Mike joined us in the studio and his accent seemed to thicken as he spoke into the microphone deep in the heart of his home state of Texas. The djs were pretty star struck as they’d converse with Peter and Mike, and it was new to them to hear Mike’s crazy comments and non-sequiturs as he’d “answer” their questions with questions in his usual zany way. I merely stood in the background, capturing it on film and enjoying the behind the scenes fun.

The djs only had a little while to “endure” the mind of Mike; as all four Monkees were due for an appearance on a local TV station. Mike had come in a limo on his own, so I traveled with Peter in his limo. As we approached the TV station, I had a strange feeling of déjà vu. I had once been trapped inside a limousine with the Dave Clark Five as fans began to crawl on the hood and beat on the windows and roof. It was frightening then, and it was this time, too,  as some 500 fans swarmed Peter’s limo, completely surrounding us! Peter could see the fear in my eyes, and he sweetly wrapped his arm around me and said, “It will be okay, Annie.”

Luckily, with a large amount of security guard protection, Peter squeezed out and ran the gauntlet into the TV station. I was not so fortunate. I was trapped inside the limo, just me and the limo driver. A few minutes later Mike’s limo pulled up, the fans surrounded his limo, but like Peter, Mike made it inside. So, I missed their TV appearance, but that was the easy part, merely waiting it out inside the limo. The limo driver communicated with the security guards by walkie talkies and they realized there was no way the boys were getting out the same way they got in! More fans gathered as each minute passed.

Oh how I love it when a plan comes together. We had dropped them off at the TV station entrance on the East side of the building. The next thing I know the limo driver is telling me the Monkees have climbed onto the roof of the TV station and he floors it, as they are running the half-block across the roof of the building! He careens around the end of the building and we are racing towards them as they scramble down the escape ladder on the West side of the building and make a mad dash for our limos. It could easily have been a scene from one of their TV shows, but it was oh so real. All safe inside, in one piece, Mike and Micky in one limo, Peter and Davy in mine, we zip off for the hotel before the fans can catch us!

Their concert that night at the Memorial Auditorium was incredible and I got some great photos. After the concert, I flew down to Houston, where there were more surprises in store for me!

Good times. . .Ann Moses reporting about “back in the day.”

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Once Peter and I got to know one another, he was always so nice, treating me like a friend and willing to answer any of my questions.He would even ask me things about my life. When you are interviewing superstars, that’s unusual!

It had been about a couple of months since the Monkees wrapped their first season on television, and I hadn’t seen them for weeks as they prepared for their big summer tour starting at Wembly Pool stadium in London on June 30, 1967. For their last few appearances on the tour, I had made arrangements to fly into Dallas and spend four days with them beginning August 8, 1967.

I had been on several tours with Paul Revere and the Raiders, Dino, Desi and Billy and The Standells; and I had been to a few Monkee concerts. My favorite was when the Monkees appeared at the Hollywood Bowl in Hollywood and Micky finished the show in spectacular fashion by leaping into the fountain/pool in front of the stage. While this wasn’t my first tag-along, I was still not immune to the excitement and that feeling of being someone very special to be a part of their entourage.

I flew into Dallas. Nothing remarkable about that except that my first time on an airplane was when I had just turned 18, and this was just about a year later, so even the air travel was thrilling. The boys spent the day before their concert resting and lounging at our hotel. I managed some time by the pool and got some great pictures of Davy and Peter as they relaxed with their friends who were their guests on tour.

The next day was a “work” day, and Peter invited me to ride along in his limo for a guest appearance (and

Mike answering questions at radio station KVIL in Dallas.

promotion) on radio station KVIL. The disc jockeys were amazed at how competent Peter was at the control panel playing records and how comfortably he carried on as a “guest disc jockey” between numbers. The Monkees had met the Beatles when they were in London, so it wasn’t surprising that Peter chose to play cuts from “Sgt. Pepper’s” album.

Soon, Mike joined us in the studio and his accent seemed to thicken as he spoke into the microphone deep in the heart of his home state of Texas. The djs were pretty star struck as they’d converse with Peter and Mike, and it was new to them to hear Mike’s crazy comments and non-sequiturs as he’d “answer” their questions with questions in his usual zany way. I merely stood in the background, capturing it on film and enjoying the behind the scenes fun.

The djs only had a little while to “endure” the mind of Mike; as all four Monkees were due for an appearance on a local TV station. Mike had come in a limo on his own, so I traveled with Peter in his limo. As we approached the TV station, I had a strange feeling of déjà vu. I had once been trapped inside a limousine with the Dave Clark Five as fans began to crawl on the hood and beat on the windows and roof. It was frightening then, and it was this time, too,  as some 500 fans swarmed Peter’s limo, completely surrounding us! Peter could see the fear in my eyes, and he sweetly wrapped his arm around me and said, “It will be okay, Annie.”

Luckily, with a large amount of security guard protection, Peter squeezed out and ran the gauntlet into the TV station. I was not so fortunate. I was trapped inside the limo, just me and the limo driver. A few minutes later Mike’s limo pulled up, the fans surrounded his limo, but like Peter, Mike made it inside. So, I missed their TV appearance, but that was the easy part, merely waiting it out inside the limo. The limo driver communicated with the security guards by walkie talkies and they realized there was no way the boys were getting out the same way they got in! More fans gathered as each minute passed.

Oh how I love it when a plan comes together. We had dropped them off at the TV station entrance on the East side of the building. The next thing I know the limo driver is telling me the Monkees have climbed onto the roof of the TV station and he floors it, as they are running the half-block across the roof of the building! He careens around the end of the building and we are racing towards them as they scramble down the escape ladder on the West side of the building and make a mad dash for our limos. It could easily have been a scene from one of their TV shows, but it was oh so real. All safe inside, in one piece, Mike and Micky in one limo, Peter and Davy in mine, we zip off for the hotel before the fans can catch us!

Their concert that night at the Memorial Auditorium was incredible and I got some great photos. After the concert, I flew down to Houston, where there were more surprises in store for me!

Good times. . .Ann Moses reporting about “back in the day.”

Source:  

The Monkees Great Escape

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Gillian Welch at Brighton Dome, 12/11/11 http://www.rocksbackpagesblogs.com/2011/11/gillian-welch-at-brighton-dome-121111/ http://www.rocksbackpagesblogs.com/2011/11/gillian-welch-at-brighton-dome-121111/#comments Mon, 14 Nov 2011 13:17:49 +0000 Chris Charlesworth http://www.rocksbackpagesblogs.com/?p=47513 Continue reading ]]> The aching melancholia of Gillian Welch’s songs about struggle is only partially balanced by the sprightly, lyrical playing of her immensely skilled guitarist and partner David Rawlings. In a concert that lasted well over two hours and included almost 30 songs, Ms Welch demonstrated levels of sincerity and soulfulness that puts to the sword the shallow nature of so much that passes for popular music in the 21st century. The roots of her material, a timeless hybrid of country, bluegrass and folk all wrapped up into the generalisation of Americana, stretch back beyond Hank Williams and Woody Guthrie to as far away as Stephen Foster, and are all the more remarkable for having been written in the past two decades. When Ms Welch sings hauntingly of the hardships endured by migrants and orphans, and poor families who place their trust in God, you are taken back to the Great Depression, that time and place in American history documented by John Steinbeck and now re-interpreted by this slight, self-effacing and likeable girl whose superb performance brought Brighton Dome to its feet in their repeated demands for encore after encore that climaxed, uncharacteristically, in a shattering run through Jefferson’s Airplane’s ‘White Rabbit’. I could happily have listened to her and David all night.

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Faces/Hucknall – A dilemma http://www.rocksbackpagesblogs.com/2010/06/faceshucknall-a-dilemma/ http://www.rocksbackpagesblogs.com/2010/06/faceshucknall-a-dilemma/#comments Mon, 07 Jun 2010 12:35:31 +0000 Chris Charlesworth http://www.rocksbackpagesblogs.com/2010/06/faceshucknall-a-dilemma/ Continue reading ]]> There has been plenty of comment about Mick Hucknall’s suitability or otherwise as a replacement for Rod Stewart in a reformed Faces but unless I’ve missed it what no-one seems to have mentioned is what they might actually play. When The Faces played live back in the day their repertoire consisted of around 50% songs from Faces albums and 50% songs from Rod’s solo albums, including many of the (often splendid) covers that Rod chose to record on those albums. And the general consensus of opinion in those days was that Rod’s albums were superior to Faces’ albums.

Presumably, without Rod, there won’t be the incentive or the will to play the material from his albums, and what with Ronnie Lane regrettably not around to sing his songs, this will surely leave them with a chronic lack of material.

Unless, of course, The Faces chance their arm on a few Simply Red songs. Oh dear…

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JAILHOUSE ROCK BRAZILIAN STYLE http://www.rocksbackpagesblogs.com/2010/04/jailhouse-rock-brazilian-style/ http://www.rocksbackpagesblogs.com/2010/04/jailhouse-rock-brazilian-style/#comments Mon, 26 Apr 2010 08:54:38 +0000 Chris Charlesworth http://www.rocksbackpagesblogs.com/2010/04/jailhouse-rock-brazilian-style/ Continue reading ]]> I came across this hilarious document in an Elvis book many years ago and Xeroxed it. At the weekend I was clearing out some old files and I came across it again. It is evidently an aural transcription of the lyrics to Jailhouse Rock, which was actually printed on the cover of an old Brazilian Elvis LP.

One, two part in the cany dial
Prison in the stand they forgot the wale
When this job is none
The job began to swing
You should have to rock
Dead jail bird sing let’s rock
Everybody let’s rock
Everybody in all say oh! Bob
You stand till Jail our rock

Start a marble place in the saxphone
Little Joe in blow in old sax trombone
Climb across the matter
You gonna track oil band
You hold a red sax
You wanna purple game

Now I’m part of seven
Said my mamma three
You use cute this Jail further ever did see
I show I’ll be alive when you call for me
Come on and do the Jail
Let’s rock it wanna be

It said sax is secret on the block stone
You call in the corner we are not alone
You want to say
Nobody don’t be no square
You can’t by a part
It used to worry in Jail

She forgot her sad about for heaven sake
It want look matter just to make a break
Brother turn his shirt
To empty sad Mrs Smith
I want to stick around
Or wanna give my kick

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Carol Clerk http://www.rocksbackpagesblogs.com/2010/03/carol-clerk/ http://www.rocksbackpagesblogs.com/2010/03/carol-clerk/#comments Mon, 15 Mar 2010 13:52:44 +0000 Chris Charlesworth http://www.rocksbackpagesblogs.com/2010/03/carol-clerk/ Continue reading ]]> I’m sure I’m not alone amongst RBP contributors in mourning the death this weekend of Carol Clerk. I first met Carol in 1972 when she turned up out of the blue at the offices of Melody Maker on Fleet Street, just to say hello to the staff on the paper she read avidly each week at her home in Belfast. Charmed by her enthusiasm and probably not a little flattered, Roy Hollingworth and I took her for a drink in our local, the Red Lion at the back of the building. She was a big MM fan and no-one was surprised when a few years later she joined the staff, hanging on in there until the bitter end in 1999, its News Editor, a real pillar of strength on the ailing magazine and a fine journalist to boot.

Later she wrote four books for Omnibus which I commissioned and edited, on The Damned, Hawkwind, The Pogues and Madonna, and all of them reflected her superlatively professional work ethic. Until she moved down to Kent we saw one another about once a year to discuss projects, and I was last in contact with her in January, wondering why she hadn’t delivered a promised update to the Hawkwind book that was slightly overdue. She said she was sorry but she hadn’t been well. My God! But that was Carol – 100% professional even if she was in the throes of a fatal illness which, bravely, she kept to herself.

I will miss her a lot. RIP Carol. One of the best of us.

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Best Beatles cover ever? http://www.rocksbackpagesblogs.com/2010/02/best-beatles-cover-ever/ http://www.rocksbackpagesblogs.com/2010/02/best-beatles-cover-ever/#comments Fri, 12 Feb 2010 15:09:51 +0000 Chris Charlesworth http://www.rocksbackpagesblogs.com/2010/02/best-beatles-cover-ever/ Check this out music lovers…

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John Lennon For Nobel Peace Prize http://www.rocksbackpagesblogs.com/2009/12/john-lennon-for-nobel-peace-prize/ http://www.rocksbackpagesblogs.com/2009/12/john-lennon-for-nobel-peace-prize/#comments Wed, 09 Dec 2009 15:25:00 +0000 Chris Charlesworth http://www.rocksbackpagesblogs.com/2009/12/john-lennon-for-nobel-peace-prize/ Continue reading ]]> Twenty-nine years ago today I awoke to the news that John Lennon had been murdered by a gun-toting lunatic in New York, and it still rankles.

Henry Kissinger, who I believe is still wanted for war crimes in parts of south east Asia, was awarded a Nobel Peace Prize in 1973.

John, whose song ‘Give Peace A Chance’ has become the anthem of peace campaigners everywhere and will likely remain so until the end of time, and who with Yoko did more to promote peace than any man alive and continues to do so through the ongoing poularity of songs like ‘Happy Xmas (War is Over’), was to the best of my knowledge never considered for a Nobel Peace Prize.

Does anyone know whether it can be awarded posthumously? And if so might not a campaign for such an award on the 30th Anniversary of John Winston O’Boogie’s passing be a worthy cause for RBP’s contributors and readers to get behind?

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IAN DURY BIOGRAPHY http://www.rocksbackpagesblogs.com/2009/12/ian-dury-biography/ http://www.rocksbackpagesblogs.com/2009/12/ian-dury-biography/#comments Fri, 04 Dec 2009 16:29:39 +0000 Chris Charlesworth http://www.rocksbackpagesblogs.com/2009/12/ian-dury-biography/ Continue reading ]]> Let me start by declaring an interest. I commissioned, edited and published the book ‘Sex & Drugs & Rock’n'Roll: The Life Of Ian Dury’ by Richard Balls which was first published in 2000 by Omnibus Press.

This book contains 145,000 words over 336 pages and in the course of his research Richard interviewed around 50 people, fellow musicians from the Blockheads and Kilburns, business associates of Ian at Stiff and elsewhere, and many personal friends. He also met Ian and through him was granted access to an elderly relative who filled him in on the Dury ancestry. Ian was aware of the book and though he declined to be interviewed himself gave the green light to others to be interviewed.

The book has done very well. We sold almost 15,000 in hardback and it’s now done slightly more than that in a B-format (small) soft-back edition. It continues to shift around 25 a month. By rock biog standards this is pretty damn good.

In many ways this isn’t surprising. Richard, an experienced journalist on a regional daily, did a very professional job, as reflected in the reviews. Q: “This splendid bawdy account grips right from the start”; Time Out: “Very thoroughly researched…. indispensible”; The Times: “Grips right from the start”; Uncut: “A refreshing, honest, moving account”. The reviews by readers on Amazon vary from 4 to 5 star.

I mention all this because it has come to my attention that in January Sidgwick & Jackson will publish a book entitled ‘Ian Dury: The Definitive Biography’ by Will Birch.

Now I have nothing against Will Birch who by all accounts is a grand bloke and his book on Ian certainly won’t be shabby. However, its publishers are promoting it with blurb that opens with the following statement:

This groundbreaking and authoritative book gives the first in-depth and compelling account of the life of this charismatic yet complex artist.

The implication here is that this new book is the first decent biography of Ian. This is an outright lie. Richard’s book was and remains the first in-depth and compelling account of Ian’s life. It is and remains definitive.

There are some who might accuse me of sour grapes here, but it seems iniquitous to me that when a reasonable length of time has elapsed between biographies, in this case a decade, publishers seem to think they can make claims for the merits a new biography while ignoring the existence of a previous (equally meritorious) biography. The hope, of course, is that reviewers of the new book will be unfamiliar with the previous work, regurgitate the blurb and fail to note that – and I’m guessing here, of course – it reiterates biographical information that has been readily available for a considerable period of time.

Here’s hoping that those who bought ‘Sex & Drugs & Rock’n’Roll’ – and there’s well over 30,000 of them, almost all in the UK – won’t make the same mistake.

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MOST PLAYED http://www.rocksbackpagesblogs.com/2009/12/most-played/ http://www.rocksbackpagesblogs.com/2009/12/most-played/#comments Wed, 02 Dec 2009 13:39:29 +0000 Chris Charlesworth http://www.rocksbackpagesblogs.com/2009/12/most-played/ Continue reading ]]> My iPod is my best friend that doesn’t breathe. It accompanies me everywhere, on the trains to and from London every day, when I walk my dog in the Surrey Hills and when I go to the supermarket. I plug it into my car stereo when I’m driving. Now that I have a business-like docking speaker in the dining room it provides accompaniment for meals and, when I’m relaxing in the sitting room and the TV is off, I plug it into the stereo to save having to find CDs. I’ve even taken it to parties in case the host’s music is lacking.

The number of songs on my iPod fluctuates but at the time of writing there are 7,477, almost full but enough for any one time I think. I have experimented with creating my own temporary ‘on the go’ playlists, but the two permanent ones (Top Rated and Most Played) tend to be used when I’m lazy. There are 554 ‘Top Rated’ songs right now, and the regulation 25 ‘Most Played’. Of course the Most Played tend to be songs which have been on the iPod the longest – anything new won’t have reached this level yet – so although the list might appear to condemn me as someone who wallows in nostalgia, this isn’t strictly true. There is plenty of newer stuff on the iPod but it hasn’t been played so much because it hasn’t been on as long, and when I delete old stuff to make way for new I won’t delete all time favourites.

Here Is my current 25 Most Played, with a comment or two. There’s an element of randomness to this list but mostly I’ve pressed play because I simply want to hear them again and again. The actual number of plays vary from somewhere in the high 40s down to the 20s, and some might be tied.

1) There She Goes – The La’s
Just perfect pop I guess. A song I never tire of.
2) Walking The Long Miles Home (Live, from Austin 2/7/01) – Richard Thompson
The first of five Thompson songs in the list including one with Linda, making him the most played artist on my iPod. This live album is terrific.
3) How Can I Tell You – Cat Stevens
Mrs C is a big fan and I’m partial to this song too. One of the most romantic songs ever written.
4) Brown Eyed Girl (Van Morrison)
More perfect pop.
5) Don’t Worry Baby – Beach Boys
My favourite BB song. It’s quite possible that this ought to be higher on the list as another, newer, re-mixed version is on the iPod too, and this has been played a lot as well. It could even to be number one on aggregate plays.
6) Going’ Back – The Byrds
Just a great version of a beautiful song.
7) Teach Your Children – CSN&Y
Another Mrs C favourite. We never miss Goldrush, a CSN&Y tribute band, when they play at our village pub.
8) Something – The Beatles
This is the version from the Love album, remastered. Up there in my top five Beatle songs, along with Don’t Let Me Down and their spin through Long tall Sally.
9) Waterloo Sunset – The Kinks
Everybody’s favourite Kinks song.
10) Going To California (Live from Earls Court, 1975) – Led Zeppelin
Mrs C’s favourite Zep song, beautifully played.
11) Dimming Of The Day – Richard & Linda Thompson
A live duet from the Life & Times of RT box set. I adored this version when I first heard it and for a long time it was number one most played. Somehow it’s slipped down the chart.
12) If Paradise Is (Half As Nice) – Amen Corner
An odd favourite of mine that I never tire of. Another in the same category – random 60s pop – that’s probably hovering underneath the 25 is I Can’t Let Maggie Go by Honeybus.
13) I Want You – Dylan
Tambourine Man is my favourite Dylan song but that doesn’t make the list somehow. This is a pretty good substitute.
14) Highway Patrolman (live, Dublin) – Springsteen & Sessions Band
I loved this ‘story’ song when I first heard it on Nebraska but this version is the best.
15) Make Me A Pallet On Your Floor – Gillian Welch
A guy at work turned me on to GW about six years ago and I now play her a lot. Her take on this old blues song by Mississippi John Hurt is as good as she gets.
16) Rockin’ Chair (Live, RAH, 6/2/21) – The Band
Probably my favourite Band song, and much played because of the counterpoint vocals during the last verse. From that 5-CD box set/book with a knockout version of Slippin’ & Slidin’ which is almost certainly hovering just under this list.
17) Positively Fourth Street – Dylan
Probably the best put down song ever written. Glad it wasn’t about me.
18) In My Command – Crowded House
I love Crowded House but I’m not too sure why this song of theirs has been played more than any other. Distant Sun and Into Temptation are up there too.
19) Mother Knows Best – Richard Thompson
Thompson on fire.
20) Nothing Compares To You – Sinead O’Connor
Another favourite of Mrs C.
21) In My Hour Of Darkness – Gram Parsons
My favourite GP song.
22) Cooksferry Queen (Live, from Austin) – Richard Thompson
Opening song on this live CD, a real belter.
23) Twist And Shout – Beatles
I gave a talk on John Lennon earlier this year but before I said a word I played this loud. It said everything there was to say really.
24) Roy Orbison Knows – John Wesley Harding
Wes was a pal of mine years ago and this song has stuck in my consciousness ever since. This version is from his first ever (live) album which has a picture of my old Gibson guitar on the back.
25) 1953 Vincent Black Lightning (Live, Austin) – Richard Thompson
Probably my favourite RT song, and what I said about Don’t Worry Baby applies to this too, though in this case there’s two other versions on the IPod, both of which have been played a fair bit too, so the aggregate total of all three will put this much higher.

Those who know me might wonder why there’s nothing by The Who or R.E.M. (or more Springsteen) on this list and I have no explanation other than that if I listed numbers 26-50 they’d probably be there. (There’s more Who tracks on the iPod than anyone else actually – 347!) Maybe another time…

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Departing Reading 2009 http://www.rocksbackpagesblogs.com/2009/09/departing-reading-2009/ http://www.rocksbackpagesblogs.com/2009/09/departing-reading-2009/#comments Tue, 01 Sep 2009 13:28:11 +0000 Chris Charlesworth http://www.rocksbackpagesblogs.com/?p=2163 Continue reading ]]> Yesterday I drove to Reading pick up my 17-year-old daughter who had spent five days and four nights in a tent at the festival along with a crowd of friends, her first ever big rock experience. In some ways she’s a chip off the old block but you know what – the departing Reading audience in their teeming hordes, magnificent in their unwashed disarray, their hair uncombed, their clothes filthy, all carrying their belongings like refugees from a war zone, looked exactly the same to my eyes as the tribes who descended on Bath and the IOW and Plumpton and the rest in my festival days. Almost 40 years have passed and the music has certainly changed, but those who love it now look absolutely identical to those who loved it then.

Olivia and her three friends couldn’t stay awake in the car on the drive home but before they all nodded off there was a fierce discussion on the relative merits of the sets performed by Radiohead, Arctic Monkeys, Prodigy, Jamie T and more. I wished I could have joined in and, indeed, tried to at one point but Olivia gave me the sort of look that communicated, “Shut up dad, just drive.” So I did.

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